S. H. Hall remembers T. B. Larimore

S. H. Hall remembers T. B. Larimore

Part 2 of Samuel Henry Hall’s reminiscences of three men who significantly influenced his life and ministry: David Lipscomb, T. B. Larimore and James A. Harding.  I prefaced the first installment, on David Lipscomb, with a brief biographical sketch on Hall.  By way of footnotes I again insert a few clarifying details.    Additional information about Hall is available at here.

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Excerpted from chapter 3 of S. H. Hall, Sixty-Five Years in the Pulpit, Or, Compound Interest in Religion. Nashville: Gospel Advocate Company, 1959. Pages 14-15.

T. B. LARIMORE – He was at his best when I began to preach.  I heard so much about him and it was so favorable that I wondered if T. B. Larimore would leave this old world as did Enoch and Elijah and be relieved to what is known as death’s transition.  I have not the words to express the powerful influence he had on me.  We were blessed in our Atlanta work – I believe it was the third year – by having him there for a revival.[1]  He had his peculiarities, which never did any harm to a human soul, but sometimes embarrassed his friends.

            Brother O. B. Curtis, who perhaps knew Larimore as but few knew him, having been with him and led the singing the whole time he lived in Washington, D.C.[2], and who is now out very efficient song leader at Arcadia, California, made the statement a few days ago that he never heard Larimore say one harmful thing about anyone.  This made me think of a little of my experience with him.  I was preaching regularly once a month and doing all the mission work in the summer for a congregation[3] that once had on its board of elders a very shrewd lawyer, who took a position as legal adviser to the leader of a very strong religious cult that believed in Triune Immersion.  He was immersed in this way, doubtless, to please the one who was paying him a big salary.  But his services ended and he returned to his home town and, it seemed, expected to be received in full fellowship and to be recognized as an elder as he was before he left; however, he was not recognized.  He came to my room almost every day complaining about the treatment he was receiving, and spoke of what E. A. Elam, T. B. Larimore and others thought of him.  Some of our best were they, and I was just a very young preacher.  This was just before our move to Atlanta, Georgia.  He had a great deal to say about prophecy and gave me one position which he stated he also gave to Larimore, for which, Larimore said he never thought of before and thanked him most graciously for the thought.  While Larimore was in a revival in Nashville the lawyer chanced to be in Nashville also, and learning of Larimore’s being there and where he was preaching, decided to go and hear him.[4]  He got there a little late, and as he entered the building he was pleased to hear Larimore discussing the very point in prophecy that he has pointed out to him.  So, Larimore, seeing this great lawyer coming down the aisle, at once stopped his sermon and stated: “Friends, since beginning this sermon, I see a friend of mine is here and he knows more about this subject than I do, and I am inviting him to the stand to discuss it in my stead.”  This lawyer had related this a number of times to show what great men such as Larimore had thought of him, and as a rebuke to his elders at home for repudiating him as an elder.  He related this to me a number of times, and deep down in my heart I /15/ did not believe it and made up my mind if I ever met Larimore, I would ask him about it.  So one Christmas, as I was changing trains in Nashville, I met Brother Larimore in the waiting room.  After a little conversation about where I had been and where I was going, I stated, “Brother Larimore, I have a question that I want to ask you, and I hope you will not think it out of place for me to ask it.” I related the whole story, then stated, “I have wondered, Brother Larimore, if you did do this.” Get this – he raised those long arms and gently placed his hands on my shoulders and looked me straight in the eye – his eyes were so gentle and beamed with kindness, and said, “Brother Hall, you will never be any worse off if you never know.  Miss Emma Page is in the women’s waiting room, would you not like to speak to her?”  Into that room we went and I visited awhile and then took my train for home wondering what did he mean by saying, “Brother Hall, you will never be any worse off if you never know.”  My only conclusion was he feared that if he stated the whole story was false, I would abuse the information and say too much about it.  But that’s that.

            What did Larimore mean to me?  Well, I got this great lesson – you need absolutely nothing to be a good preacher of the gospel except to know the Book, the exact sayings of our Lord, and tell it to the people.  If ever a man spoke where the Bible speaks and stayed silent where it is silent, Larimore did just that.


[1] Hall began his work in Atlanta the first of January 1907, see p. 17; Larimore’s meeting there would have been in about 1910.

[2] 1922-1925, see Doug Foster on Larimore in Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement, 453.

[3] Smithville, Tennessee, from 1904-1906, see p. 9.  Hall helped establish three congregations in and around Smithville during this time.

[4] Larimore’s first revival in Nashville was in 1885; he preached often for Christian Churches in Nashville from 1885-1906 including a long meeting in 1887 when the South College Street Christian Church was set in order.  David Lipscomb was one of the elders at South College Street from 1887 until his death in 1917.  Larimore and Emma Page were married 1 January 1911; see Terry J. Gardner on Emma Page Larimore in Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement, 452.

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One thought on “S. H. Hall remembers T. B. Larimore

  1. S. H. Hall had one son, who had one son, who had one daughter, who had one daughter. Five generations and just a single descendant for each! Today’s odd fact.

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