Two Cane Ridge Revival items, 1852 and 1889

A few days ago I blogged James Trader’s want-list for the archives at Cane Ridge.  Two items on the list are available on Google Books.  I am pleased to learn of them as I do not recall seeing reference to either.  Here are two points in the history of memory of this momentous event.

First, the Magazine of Western History, December 1889 issue has this long article by Isaac Smucker:

Second, Henry Howe, Historical Collections of the Great West in 2 vols.  Vol. 1 notes the exercises; vol. 2 notes Cane Ridge in particular.

From vol. 1, pp. 189-190:

Volume 2, pages 215ff

Name Authority for Nashville, Tennessee Stone-Campbell Congregations

Name Authority for Nashville Tennessee Stone-Campbell Congregations, September 2012

Click above to download a document listing 319 variants of time-, place- and character-names for the 227 known congregations of the Stone-Campbell movement in Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee from 1812 to September 2012.

To my knowledge my work in this area is the only such compilation, and therefore, the most complete.  The initial publication of the list to this blog was in May 2010 as a first step in my research toward a book on the Restoration Movement in Nashville.  I blogged then:

With over 200 congregations in this county, the congregational research alone will take years, perhaps the remainder of my life.  If I live to be 100 I may not finish even a rudimentary survey.  It may be too much:  too many congregations, too many preachers, too much ‘story’ to tell.

But this is where I am at the present.  I publish the list here to generate interest, additions, subtractions, corrections and clarifications.  Look it over and if I need to make changes, please let me know.

While congregational history is only one aspect of this project, this is where it all played out…on the ground in the congregations on a weekly basis.  Few congregations have attempted more than a list of preachers or a narrative of the expansion of the church building.  What I propose, as I wrote above, may be too much…too far to the other extreme.  But that fact changes not one whit the necessity of it being done.

The story of these churches in Nashville needs to be told.  I ask for your help in telling it.  look over my list; I solicit your critique. Contact me at icekm [at] aol [dot] com.

(The first version of the name authority, from May 2010, can be found here.)

Pioneers in the Great Religious Reformation of the Nineteenth Century, an engraving from about 1907

I can’t decipher the first two-thirds of this wording at the bottom, but I can make out what appears to be ‘CHRISTIAN-EVANGELIST JANUARY 17, 1907.’  Great-grandad saved several of the full-color covers from Christian Standard (which paper occasionally had special covers for special numbers…I’ll try to photograph them and post here sometime) so it seems only natural he clipped and framed a cover for Christian-Evangelist from 1907, or 1897.  I no longer have access to bound volumes or loose issues of C-E, so cannot verify this.  In any case, here it is, copy, save and print it out.  Frame it, put it in your study.  Enjoy!

That They May All Be One, That The World May Believe; 1909 Centennial Program

Frontispiece to Program of the International Centennial Celebration and Conventions of the Disciples of Christ (Christian Churches). Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1909.  Kromer Columbus Ice attended some of these proceedings.  His first child, a son, was born 5 October.  In October 1909 the Ice family lived in a duplex on the campus of Bethany College.  KC practiced medicine for Bethany villagers on one side; they lived on the other side of the house.

The full Program is available online, free, here.

Brush Run Church

This is from Christian Standard very likely ca. 1928.  The emergence of the congregation at Brush Run, Pennsylvania in 1811 marked a formative milestone in the nascent Restoration Movement.  Two hundred years later what happened here and why it matters are still topics of research and discussion.

Suggested online reading:

–Richardson’s Memoirs of Alexander Campbell

–Calvin Warpula’s article in Christian Standard

–Hal Doster’s website explores the significance of Brush Run.  (Perhaps I should mention I assisted Hal with some research on Brush Run in about 2008, and I assisted Peter Morgan with research in 2010…  Full disclosure and all).

–You can even like Brush Run on Facebook!

Though Brush Run meetinghouse was constructed of some of the material you see in this photo,  technically it is not a photo of the Brush Run church.  This is a reconstruction of it as it stood on the grounds of the Campbell Mansion at Bethany, WV in the early 20th century.  Hal’s PowerPoint presentation discusses this in detail…I wish there was an audio file to accompany his presentation.  You really need to hear Hal talk about it.

Shortly, I’ll blog about the stash of paper that yielded this clipping.  More to come!